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Secondary schools go back to hybrid for three weeks

Lowell — Based on rising numbers of COVID-19 cases and the positivity rates within Kent County in recent weeks, Lowell Middle and High schools are returning to a hybrid learning schedule beginning Monday, Nov. 2. 

The plan will follow the district’s red/white schedule it had implemented temporarily at the beginning of school, where students are split into two groups and attend in-person or online classes on alternating days. This schedule will remain in place for grades 6-12 only through Nov. 24. 

“It is our desire to return to full in-person learning for secondary students on Monday, Nov. 30, but we will continue to monitor and evaluate data in order to make the most informed decision possible,” the district said in a statement. 

Students in grades K-5 will continue with full in-person learning during this period. All-virtual students in grades 6-12 also will not see any schedule changes.

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Beth Heinen Bell
Beth Heinen Bell
Beth Heinen Bell is a reporter and copy editor, covering Cedar Springs, Godfrey-Lee, Grandville and Lowell. She is an award-winning journalist who got her start as the education reporter for the Grand Haven Tribune. A Calvin University graduate, she later returned to her alma mater to help manage its national writing festival and edit and write for enrollment communications. Beth has also written for The Grand Rapids Press, Fox 17 and several West Michigan businesses and nonprofits. She is fascinated by the nuances of language, loves to travel and has strong feelings about the Oxford comma. Read Beth's full bio or email Beth.

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