- Sponsorship -

Be safe around fireworks this summer

Learn Not To Burn This Independence Holiday!

Fireworks during the Fourth of July are as American as apple-pie, but did you know that two out of five fires reported on that day are started by fireworks, more than for any other cause? Every Independence Day holiday, thousands of people, most often children and teens, are injured while using consumer fireworks. Despite the dangers of fireworks, few people understand the associated risks which include devasting burns, injuries to the eyes, hands and face, fires and even death.

According to the latest national data from the National Fire Protection Association and Consumer Product Safety Commission, U.S. hospital emergency rooms treated an estimated 12,900 people for fireworks related injuries; 54% of those injuries were to the extremities and 36% were to the head. Children younger than 15 years of age accounted for more than one-third (36%) of the estimated injuries during 2017.

In Michigan, consumer fireworks became legal Jan. 1, 2012, and must meet CPSC standards. They can only be sold to people 18 years of age or older. Low impact fireworks (ground-based items such as sparklers, toy snakes, snaps, and poppers) are legal for sale and use. In December, 2018, new measures were signed into law (House Bill 5939) that reduce the number of days fireworks can be used, give local government more power to regulate the devices and tighten consumer sales and use.

 “The best way to stay safe from fireworks is to not use them. Instead, watch a public fireworks display, either in person or on television put on by trained experts,” said Firefighter Michael McLeieer, president of the non-profit fire safety charity E.S.C.A.P.E. “Fireworks are dangerous to people and pets. Using them puts you and your property at risk,” according to McLeieer.

 You can enjoy your holiday and the fireworks by following a few simple safety tips:

Proceed with caution!

  • Be safe.  If you want to see fireworks, watch a public show put on by the professionals.
  • Parents and caregivers should always closely supervise children at events where fireworks are used.
  • Hand-held sparklers burn at more than 1,200 °F and cause 3rd degree burns in seconds.  As a comparison, wood ignites at 356 F.
  • If you decide to use sparklers, place discarded sparker wires in a metal bucket filled with water.
  • Sparklers account for roughly one-quarter (25%) of emergency room fireworks injuries.
  • After the fireworks display, children should never pick up fireworks that may be left over since they may still be active.
  • Adults should not consume alcohol when using fireworks.
  • Follow the local ordinance and state law regarding the use of consumer fireworks.
  • Leave pets at home and keep them inside during fireworks displays.

E.S.C.A.P.E. Fire Safety urges Michiganders to use common sense, be aware of your surroundings and follow safety rules this Fourth of July during holiday celebrations where you live!

E.S.C.A.P.E. Fire Safety is a sponsor for School News Network
E.S.C.A.P.E. Fire Safety is a sponsor for School News Network
- Sponsorship -

LATEST ARTICLES

Hands-on history: museum becomes classroom for curious students

It’s one thing to study about history in a virtual classroom; it’s another to be immersed in it inside a museum. Students from every area district now have the opportunity to experience hands-on lessons in after-school programs for third- through eighth-graders at the Grand Rapids Public Museum...

Teacher recruits from Puerto Rico find welcoming new home in Grand Rapids

A recruiting trip to Puerto Rico brought two new teachers to Grand Rapids as part of an innovative district effort to address a shortage of bilingual instructors...

Fifth-graders find beauty in science by dissecting marigolds

One teacher used readily available nature just outside school to introduce this year’s science unit, as well as flowers from home to study the parts of plants...

District bond request Nov. 3 includes upgrades, additions and community wellness & resource center

Godfrey-Lee Public Schools is asking voters to approve a 30-year, $17.79 million bond proposal to fund major reconstruction, additions and improvements to Lee Middle and High School...

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Related Articles

Why I sub…

Mya Fullmer is one of the video contest winners in the EduStaff competition, with a very funny entry that anyone who’s ever been in a classroom can enjoy...

It’s Burn Awareness Week – do you know these tips?

Scald injuries affect all ages and about every 60 seconds, someone in the U.S. gets burned. Children, older adults and people with disabilities are most vulnerable. Since this is Burn Awareness Week, E.S.C.A.P.E. Fire Safety staff provided this information on scald injury prevention...
- Sponsorship -

HOW'S SCHOOL TODAY?

Engagement: The Most Important Measure of Student Success

Polls find that students’ engagement in their school work declines as they ascend the grades. Tests that don’t relate to their real-life experiences exacerbate the problem...

RADEMACHER & FRIENDS

Food ‘angels’ support hungry kids through pandemic

They work all across Kent County, guardian angels with peanut butter on their hands and crumbs on their shirtsleeves...
- Sponsorship -

MEDIA PARTNERS

Maranda Where You LiveWGVU

SUSTAINING SPONSORS